What are PCOS and Endometriosis and How Do They Affect Me?

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and endometriosis (endo) are two gynecological disorders that affect approximately one in ten of women at childbearing age.

I am one in ten. I have PCOS.

My sister is also one in ten, however she has both PCOS and endometriosis.

I got lucky, and the first month I had real medical assistance, I got pregnant. It is not common for medical assistance to work so quickly, and I am forever grateful that it did for me.

So, what are polycystic ovary syndrome and endometriosis, and how are they tied to fertility?

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Handling the NICU Roller Coaster

When you’re in the NICU with your baby, things can change from good to bad in the blink of an eye. Likewise, they can also go from dire to great at the drop of a hat!

Of course, “good” or “great” are relative descriptions when you are stuck in the hospital and can’t take your baby home with you.

Regardless, there are many ups and downs within the NICU walls. Also, just because your baby is doing well, doesn’t mean that you will be doing well.

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My 5 Ideas to Ditching the Baby Weight

Like most women in this day and age, I’ve always had body image problems, and I’ve carried around some extra weight.

Before I got pregnant, I was diagnosed with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS). I have a plan for a blog later on to go into more depth about PCOS, Endometriosis, and Anovulation, but one symptom of PCOS is weight gain/an inability to lose weight.

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Complications in the NICU

When you’re in the NICU, you can really ever know what to expect. Truthfully, when you’re in the hospital period, you can never really know what to expect.

There are about a million different potential health problems your baby could have, depending on why you went in to labor early, the gestational age of your baby, ethnicity, family history, you name it. Each of those problems comes with several possible treatments. Those treatments all come with their own laundry list of possible side effects or complications.

We were extremely fortunate in that our son was born with a very short list of complications. Unfortunately, our big scare came from a leak in his PICC line.

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My Favorite 12 Baby Items

Setting up for your Amazon Baby Registry can be such a fun and exciting task, but it can also get incredibly overwhelming in the blink of an eye.

When I started my registry, I was so overwhelmed with all the baby stuff!

There’s cribs, swings, bottles, diaper bags, blankets, swaddlers, toys, diapers, sheets, burp cloths, high chairs, car seats, strollers, changing tables, pacifiers, mattresses, thermometers, thermometers, baby books, outlet covers, monitors…are you overwhelmed yet?

Seriously, how on earth can such a tiny human require so much stuff!?!

If you’re looking to buy a present for an expecting family, it can also be hard to know exactly what to get, especially if they don’t have a registry set up.

To help make your life a little easier, here is a list of my top 12 favorite baby items that I use, and recommend you add to your registry.

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The Grief is Real

I don’t know about other parents of preemie babies, and I’m not even sure I can speak for my husband, but when my son was born so early, I believe I went through the five stages of grief.

I realize that things could have been worse for me and my family. I could have lost my son, and possibly lost my life. I understand that, and while it may seem selfish of me, knowing “it could be worse” or seeing that other parents in the NICU had it worse actually made me feel worse, not more grateful.

I felt guilty for feeling sad. I felt like an awful person for being sad that my son was alive and actually doing very well compared to other babies. I felt ungrateful every time my heart ached and I cried, because my son got extubated relatively quickly, he didn’t have a tracheotomy, he didn’t have a brain bleed, he didn’t have any cardiovascular problems. Relatively/comparatively speaking, he was fine.

Yet still, I grieved, and mourned things lost to us as a family, and to me as a mother. I grieved, and now looking back, I think it would have been odd if I hadn’t.

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